Welcome to your Personal Sleep Assessment!

My name is AIDEN, your personal sleep expert. I will ask you a few questions to learn about your current sleep experience. Using your answers, I will build you a personal sleep profile and provide you with a summary & recommendations to help you make decisions today to give you well rested nights and better tomorrows. It will take just a few minutes.

On WEEK days how many hours of sleep do you get?

How refreshed do you usually feel when you wake up each morning?

How regular is your bedtime each week?

How often do you have problems falling asleep or staying asleep per week?

Do you snore loudly (as loud as talking)?

What are the most common things that prevent you from sleeping?

Hold down Ctrl (windows) or Command (Mac) to select all that apply.

On average, how many caffeinated drinks do you have per day?

On WEEK days, what time do you have to normally wake up?

When you suffer from a lack of sleep, what usually happens?

Hold down Ctrl (windows) or Command (Mac) to select all that apply.

Which one of these types do you consider yourself to be?

When do you feel you are at your peak and most alert?

Developed by a Leading Sleep Scientist

Dr. Matthew Walker

The data and information in the Sleep Assessment has been developed by Dr. Matthew Walker, author of the international bestseller “Why We Sleep" and Lead Sleep Science Advisor at BRYTE. With a degree in neuroscience and a PhD in neurophysiology, Dr. Walker currently serves as Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, USA. He is also the Founder and Director of the Center for Human Sleep Science.

Dr. Walker’s research examines the impact of sleep on human brain function in healthy and disease populations. To date, he has published over 100 scientific research studies.

Personal Sleep Profile

I will analyze your assessment results and will provide you with a detailed Sleep Summary specific to you. Here's what to expect from your summary.


How do we calculate Sleep Quality?

I start by looking at the quantity of sleep you're getting per night to understand if it's a quantity and/or quality issue. Then I look at things like how quickly you fall asleep, how often you wake in the night and how rested you feel during the day.

What does Sleep Debt mean?

Sleep debt is the difference between how much sleep you get each week vs. the amount of sleep you need to perform at your peak.

What are External Effects?

External effects are things in your life that could contribute to lower sleep quality. These include things such as stress, caffeine intake and sleeping temperature.

What is a Chronotype?

Your Chronotype answers whether you are a morning type (morning lark) or an evening type (night owl). This defines the timing of your circadian (24 hour) rhythm, and when you’re at your peak alertness during the day. Most people don’t realize that your chronotype isn’t a choice, but actually genetic.

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Your Personal Sleep Summary

Sleep Quality

Poor

Average

Good

Excellent

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Weekly Sleep Debt

Low

Moderate

High

Very High

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External Effects

Low

Moderate

High

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Chronotype

Morning Lark

Night Owl

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Tips from AIDEN

You did it! I have analyzed the answers you’ve provided and have prepared the summary and recommendations below. I will follow up with you from time to time to offer you personalized sleep tips as developed by our Lead Sleep Scientist, Dr. Matthew Walker.

Sleep Quality & Debt

It looks like you are suffering from a sleep deficiency and are in need of more sleep. The World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control recommend getting at least 7 hours of sleep, as consistently as possible. Tonight, try going to bed 5 minutes earlier, and after a week, try adding 10 minutes, until you are able to close that sleep deficit gap.

You are not quite getting the sleep you need. The World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control recommend getting at least 7 hours of sleep, as consistently as possible. Tonight, try going to bed 5 minutes earlier, and after a week, try adding 10 minutes, until you are able to close that sleep deficit gap.

Nice work! You're getting enough sleep. The World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control recommend getting at least 7 hours of sleep, as consistently as possible. Keep on keepin' on with the number of hours of sleep you're getting.

It looks like you’re suffering from a sleep deficiency and are in need of more sleep. The World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control recommend getting at least 7 hours of sleep, as consistently as possible.

In addition to not getting enough hours of sleep, there may be issues with the quality of sleep you're getting. This could all contribute to excessive daytime sleepiness. Try giving yourself an extra 15 minutes of sleep in the morning.

Although you are getting enough sleep, it looks like there may be issues with the quality of sleep you're getting, which may contribute to excessive daytime sleepiness. Try giving yourself an extra 15 minutes of sleep in the morning.

In addition to not getting enough hours of sleep, there may be issues with the quality of sleep you're getting. This could all contribute to excessive daytime sleepiness. Since you often have trouble falling asleep, try keeping a very strict and regular sleep schedule.

Although you are getting enough sleep, it looks like there may be issues with the quality of sleep you're getting, which may contribute to excessive daytime sleepiness. Since you often have trouble falling asleep, try keeping a very strict and regular sleep schedule.

You indicated you snore and have breathing problems throughout the night. This could suggest you are suffering from Sleep Apnea, I would recommend speaking with your doctor to rule out this common sleep disorder. Sleeping on your back or stomach can increase snoring as well as night-time waking. Try sleeping on your side to open up the air passages and improve your breathing.

You indicated that you and your partner snore throughout the night. This could suggest you have a possible Sleep Apnea disorder, I would recommend speaking with your doctor to rule out this common sleep disorder. Sleeping on your back or stomach can increase snoring as well as night-time waking. Try sleeping on your side to open up the air passages and improve your breathing.

It does appear that you consistently have trouble falling asleep and may be suffering from a sleep disorder called insomnia. I would recommend paying attention to factors that may be keeping you awake (e.g., caffeine after midday, alcohol in the evening, screen time in the last hour before bed). Many people speak with their doctor about their sleep problems. You can also visit American Academy of Sleep Medicine website to find a list of sleep medicine doctors you could contact if the problem persists.

External Effects

Nice work keeping a consistent bedtime! Going to bed and getting up at the same time helps maximize your sleep performance.

You may be suffering from "social jet lag", caused by going to bed at different times from one night to the next. If you want to maximize your sleep performance it is important to go to bed at the same time each night.

It seems that stress may be a cause of bad sleep for you – stress is well-known to disrupt sleep. Meditation, and relaxation techniques can help your body prepare for sleep by reducing cortisol and stimulating melatonin release (part of your circadian rhythm), helping you fall asleep faster. Studies also show that writing out your concerns/worries before bed reduces the amount of time it takes people to fall asleep by 50%.

It seems that being too hot may be a cause of bad sleep for you. The ideal sleeping temperature is around 65 degrees Fahrenheit - try setting your thermostat to this temperature tonight or try opening a window if it is safe to do so. Alternatively, try sleeping with a single sheet or wearing fewer clothes to bed. Controlling your temperature throughout the night has been known to improve sleep quality and quantity.

It seems that stress is a cause of bad sleep for you. Stress is well-known to disrupt sleep. Meditation, and relaxation techniques can help your body prepare for sleep by reducing cortisol and stimulating melatonin release (part of your circadian rhythm), helping you fall asleep faster. Studies also show that writing out your concerns/worries before bed reduces the amount of time it takes people to fall asleep by 50%. You also indicated that being too hot is an issue for you. The ideal sleeping temperature is around 62-65 degrees Fahrenheit - try setting your thermostat to this temperature tonight or try opening a window if it is safe to do so. Alternatively, try sleeping with a single sheet or wearing fewer clothes to bed. Controlling your temperature throughout the night has been known to improve sleep quality and quantity.

It seems that you drink higher than typical amounts of caffeine. Caffeine can make it harder to fall asleep and stay asleep. Caffeine also blocks deep, restorative sleep (also known as NREM slow wave sleep), preventing you from feeling refreshed and alert the next day. You may want to try and stop drinking caffeine or switching to decaffeinated drinks after noon.

Chronotype

Chronotype

Your chronotype defines the timing of your circadian (24 hour) rhythm, and when you’re at your peak alertness during the day. Most people don’t realize that your chronotype isn’t a choice, but actually genetic.

It looks like you are a Morning Lark! This suggests you likely prefer getting up and going to bed early, and are usually at your peak performance earlier in the day.

It looks like you are a Night Owl! This suggests you likely enjoy sleeping in and staying up late, and are usually at your peak performance in the afternoon or evening.

Peak Performance: Up to 10:30am

Peak Performance: 10:30am - 1:00pm

Peak Performance: 1:00pm - 4:00pm

Peak Performance: 4:00pm and later

Although your chronotype is genetic, you can manage this tendency a little if you choose. Here are 4 tips to help morning types become more like evenings types:

  1. Use lots of bright lights in your home in last 2-hours of the night
  2. Use blackout curtains to block any morning daylight or wear an eye mask
  3. Try to wake up 1-hour later than normal
  4. Get 1-2 hours of natural light exposure late in the afternoon, and don’t wear shades

Although your chronotype is genetic, you can manage this tendency a little if you choose. Here are 4 tips to help evening types become more like morning types:

  1. Dim half of the lights in your home in last 2 hours of the night
  2. Install software on your computers, phone, tables to reduce blue LED light
  3. Get 1-2 hours of natural light exposure in the mornings
  4. Sleep with the curtains open – natural sunrise naturally lifts your circadian rhythm to help wake you feeling refreshed and energized

Tips from AIDEN

In summary, I recommend you try the following to ensure a better nights sleep:

  • Tonight, try going to bed 10 minutes earlier, and after a week, try adding another 10 minutes, until you are able to close that sleep deficit gap.
  • Tonight, try going to bed 10 minutes earlier, and after a week, try adding another 10 minutes, until you are able to close that sleep deficit gap.
  • Keep on keepin' on with the number of hours of sleep you're getting.
  • Try giving yourself an extra 15 minutes of sleep in the morning.
  • Try giving yourself an extra 15 minutes of sleep in the morning.
  • Continue to go to bed at the same time each night and wake up at the same time every morning
  • Go to bed at the same time each night and wake up at the same time every morning.
  • Try sleeping on your side to open up the air passages and improve your breathing.
  • Try sleeping on your side to open up the air passages and improve your breathing.
  • Try meditating and/or writing out your concerns before bed.
  • Try setting your thermostat to 65 degrees fahrenheit tonight or opening a window if it is safe to do so. Alternatively, try sleeping with a single sheet or wearing fewer clothes to bed.
  • Try meditating and/or writing out your concerns before bed.
  • Try setting your thermostat to 65 degrees fahrenheit tonight or opening a window if it is safe to do so. Alternatively, try sleeping with a single sheet or wearing fewer clothes to bed.
  • Try limiting your caffeine intake or drinking decaffeinated beverages after noon.
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